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tend to be older men, educated in a certain way that didn't study such matters and most historians were not educated in the matter office -- matters of the heart and the hearth. but by studying the first ladies -- the first think thomas jefferson did after spending 1 days cooped up in a loft outside of philadelphia, writing the declaration of independence, the first thing he did was he went shopping for martha, his wife. he was pregnant and had had a miscarriage, and he bought her some gloves. then he begged off from serving for the rest of the summer so he could go home to be with his wife. every within -- every interof -- every winter of the revolutionary war, there was martha washington. i propose washington's closer advisor was alexander hamilton, and one chapter talks about hamilton's history of womanizing, bill clinton was not the first and was not the worst when it comes to misbehavior and high office. there's a long history. itot spitzer, arnold schwarzenegger, david petraeus, had nothing on alexander hamilton. if you read letters written by martha washington during those winter
, deeply grounded in our education and how it has prepared us as women and the leaders and the fact that your mom was very much an activist in the movement, and they need to know about it. i'm working on the book, this book. i said well, can i help you, can i get it published and that is how this journey began. >> bernice, when did your mother began her activism? she was born in marion alabama? >> i ron ackley if you study history, three of the leading movement, ralph abernathy and my father all have lives in alabama. how ironic is that. my mother didn't know one leader after that. she no one was much younger but they didn't know, you know, that kind of stuff and it just brought it all together. and so, growing up there in rural alabama with a father who was an entrepreneur early on and he called lumber and he did open an assault mel by a white gentleman. the father's determination to stand up to justice and continue to move to really influenced her and that produced a lot of the leaders in the nation. missionaries came and educated the reactive and why am i here driven by the fact
that our education and how it prepared us as women to be leaders and the fact that your mom was very much an activist involved in the peace movement and they need to know about her. and i said i'm working on this book. i said can i help you? get it published? this is how the journey began. >> host: bernice king your mother come to how active bushy and when did she begin her activism? was born in marion alabama? >> guest: ironically if you study history three of the leading persons in the movement ralph abernathy and my father i'll had wives from carrie county alabama. how ironic is that and mom did not know of one data abernathy. when the movement started they didn't know about them marrying different men in all of that kind of stuff and have brought it all together. and so growing up there in rural alabama with the father who was an entrepreneur or entrepreneur or leon and unheard of as an african-american had his own truck. he hauled lumber. he did open a sawmill and it was burned down by a white gentleman he hired. he would not let that stop them. implements a separate father's determi
of the commission. >> president carter appointed you. >> carter appointed me when i left his education, running education. yet in the department of education and i went back to teaching at the appointed me to the commission. >> at what point to become the the u.s. civil rights commission will become a permanent agency? >> after the first year when the reports that they did -- with the commission did was instead of sitting down and saying, okay. we are here as a safety valve and don't really -- they did some hearings. major power that the commission has, and a point this out in the book. to me it is the most important thing about the commission. does what it is supposed to do it will go out and listen to people that nobody else will listen to. problems, civil rights problems that people had that they could not get anyone to pay attention, not just local people but the federal government. it would write letters, do all kinds. no one would pay any attention. the sole rights commission decided that first year it would go out and listen to these people and see what they had to say. they had the powe
, the education. we should have spent less and save more. we should have borrowed a lot less from foreigners. one of the things a lot of people don't get, housing is consumption because people think that they invested in the house they think it's an investment. it's not. we consume a house just like an automobile if you over invest in housing what you are doing is over consuming. so a massive over consumption. it's analogous to the agricultural example. and in that process, we taught millions of people how to do the wrong thing. we taught them how to be mortgage bankers, residential legal attorneys, those millions of people are trying to learn to do something new that is productive and a global economy which is one reason it's been so it difficult to deal with what i imply that. in addition, construction is competitive with manufacturing rates. if you drive of construction wages you try to find a factor in wages which we do with an artificial construction boom and that drew millions of manufacturing jobs overseas to places like india and china. initially the people in india and china didn't know
education. got a new department of education. >> host: at what point do you become for the civil rights commission would become a permanent agency in a sense? >> guest: after the first year , what the commission did this instead of sitting down seine which is here as a safety valve, they different hearings. the major power the commission had an ipod this in the book continues the most important thing. when it does what it's supposed to do, it will go out and listen to people nobody else will listen to. the civil rights problems that people had that they could not get anyone to pay attention. not just local people, but the federal government would write letters. nobody would pay attention. the civil rights commission decided they would go out of that they had decided and they had the power under the statute to subpoena anyone. eisenhower said the reason i want to get it passed by congress to set up an executive orders because my attorney general tells me that's the only way they can subpoena anybody. some people may not want to come to testify, said the commission has the most important
in the wrong place we should invest in education, manufacturing, te chnology. should have spent less and save more and borrow bus from foreigners. one thing people don't get it is housing is consumption. they think they invested in the house if it is an investment. but we consume a house if you invest you are really over consuming. we had a massive over consumption in that process we taught millions of people how to do the wrong thing, build houses, residential and legal attorneys those people try to learn how to do something productive in a global economy which is why it is difficult to deal with unemployment. if you drive up construction wages we did that with the artificial construction that had millions of manufacturing jobs overseas like india and china. initially they did not know how to do that well and now we have a difficult time to get the jobs back. how did we make a mistake? the markets are constantly in correction process but never of that magnitude. government policy is needed for that type of mistake the federal reserve, the fdic in government housing. and a fundamental context
of diseases, to what extent have been noticed efforts to educate the human population on how to modify their lifestyle so it is better to avoid the crossover and spillover? >> there are certainly efforts. in bangladesh they're trying to educate people not to drink raw date palm staff that contains a virus. if you put the stuff you can kill the virus but people like to drink it raw. it is a tradition, a seasonal treat so there are things like that around the world. in southern china they crack down on the big what markets, at least above ground, and big wedge markets, sold live for food as a fashion in southern china, they call it wild flavor, a vote for eating wild life, not because people need the protein for subsistence, they have some money and this is considered a very robust and tasty food. one other thing on that in terms of education, of local people, i mentioned the original spillover, pandemic strain in southeastern cameron, i went to retrace probably the route it took coming out of southeastern cameron and down a river system that came along the main stem condo and eventually
republic has achieved far more progress outcomes in alleviating poverty, health care, providing educational access and expanding opportunities for women in the shah's regime aggregate. hillary and i are happy to go into this morning q&a if you like, let me give you a couple examples of what i'm talking about. the islamic republic has developed a hope your system that is greatly increase and reduce infant and child mentality in iran. the provision of health care to rural areas has been particularly impressive since the revolution. the islamic republic is basically equalized outcomes in urban and rural setting in a knot or which is really quite extraordinary in an international context. get this. there are no iranian doctors and public health specialists working with state university and ngos state of mississippi to introduce iranian styled rural health care delivery into medically underserved parts of the mississippi delta. the islamic republic is also greatly expanded educational opportunities with letter series and basically eliminating gender disparity in educational access. one facet of
, a successful farmers, people who had high education. and they traveled the world and learned from other cultures. they had out -- studied government from other countries from taking and choosing from the various things and do come up with creative solutions for the issues they thought had not been resolved. what i am gratified is more people are voting now than they have in the past years. it is their obligation. to not let the country just happened. but create the country they want. that is why i tell people when they ask how you feel about the immigration law? how do you feel? because they generally have cases and i don't want to people to believe i made at my mind. i haven't prettify express an opinion that is what they will believe. but having said that, what i often say is why aren't you asking yourself? what you doing about it? if you thank you don't like something? that is what your country was founded on with your people getting up and starting a war to start a country i am not suggesting a rebellion. [laughter] far from that, please. but i am encouraging civic responsibility. w
. they were people who had higher education's and they actually travel the world and learn from other cultures. the constitution was written by men who had studied the government's through history and other countries and picking and choosing from the various things that they saw describing the things they felt didn't work and coming up with creative solutions for the issues they thought hadn't been resolved by others. more people are voting now than they had in past years because of worries me when the citizens for debt that it is their obligation not to let the country just happened, but to create a the country that they want. they tell me how did you feel about immigration lollies, the immigration law, how do you feel about the debate on the amendment and there are always questions like that would be called i generally have the cases i am still considering our that we have made up our mind because i haven't. but if i express an opinion, that is what they will believe. having said that what you can say to them is why are you asking me? why aren't you asking yourself? what do you think? and wh
. it was in a book about teaching kids how to smoke weed, but an educational book about how they might talk to their kids about a difficult subject with him i don't run into. so that's where the format is an illustrated picture book for kids. as i got into the subject and started looking into train, which is relevant to some children's lives. their children but pickett, families involved in the oppressive policies to eradicate coca and it's a social or cultural issue. as i got deeper into the history of coca and specifically with relationships of the coca-cola company, origins from a medical marvel to the drug problem we have today, it got really complicated and so now it's a book for adults. i also started in coca with coffee because they wanted to do a comparison is not in that fascinated me with the way the drugs, plants change their perceptions over time for the cultural perceptions, the legal, social perceptions. as inspired by michael collins spoke about body of desire, where he talks about the history for different plants. when apples came to this country, they want the fleshy fruit
was going on. >> we really understood the press s educational media media, educational tv. everything that had been going on that we were involved in had been going on 100 years. it was very hard to get out. this was 1963, i was reminded fred came to get martin luther king on the 17th of december to promise he would come to birmingham this year because on the 14th f-15 to fred's church was bombed for the third time in 1962. the bombings of homes receive no publicity. but fred was quite frank that he needed martin luther king to come to get any attention to this injustice. another good friend that was with us was a cameraman was quite blunt with me about it saying you have to cut me some slack because i've got to keep the camera on dr. king. if they kill him and i don't get a picture of it, i lose my job. it was almost that cold and analysis wear -- where martin luther king knew he was being used to focus on this injustice. and did it willingly. at the same time guys like jack nelson understood that and the cameraman was lawrence peers who had been with a friend of martin's since montg
young people make it through, um, you know, their educational goals, college or graduate school, in light of runaway tuition. >> yes. >> is that right? okay. do you want -- >> and also -- [inaudible] >> right. >> i mean, how are we going to get the doctors if tuition is 70 grand a year? >> we write in the booking about how -- in the book about how hard it is for homeless kids in the cities in which they live today just get through high school. the challenge that so many kids confront, and liz murray wrote, you know, a beautiful memoir, "breaking night," about her journey from homelessness to harvard, how are we going to create opportunities for kids whose families won't or can't take care of them who have been told over and over again you're broken because they're poor or their parents hate them or reject them because they're gay or lesbian. these kids feel so damaged that college feels like another planet to them. and we write in the book about the game changing things that cities and nonprofits are doing to create high schools that are connected to homeless youth centers. ther
, that gets transferred into education, and then people make wiser decisions. i think, like you said, i mean how there's access to meth, these dirty, cheap, bad drugs, people were able to get access to much more benign drugs like marijuana, they might make decisions that if they had the education to know that this is actually a healthier choice for you. it's a harm reduction model. we might not ever get rid of drugs completely, but there are safer alternatives to the worse options. >> we have one last question over here in the corner for the evening, and then we're going to have to wrap up this portion and move on to the book signing. so the last question for the evening. >> okay. i wanted to thank you, very, very good presentation. and i think you presented a very good case where the coca leaf is innocuous or even beneficial substance. however, it is true you get cocaine from the coca, and cocaine is quite a, um, well, it's, a substance where you can make a lot of money. and you've got the drug cartels involved in that. how can you control the growth of coca without getting the drug cartels
they are so close to to the changing social make up. who is the educated workforce and the united states anymore? it's mostly women, more and more diverse. if you work it exxon and mobil and go on to your family thanksgiving dinner and say i work and exxon mobile, they suck in their breath in distain a worry, you know, that is not a winning strategy. something has to give. i'm not sure that they think that. >> it seems to me that kind of we are who we are in take-it-or-leave-it, we really don't care, has that backfired? having come a seems that could have been a force to cultivate more distrust and distaste and helped make them, as you say in the book, you know, public enemy number one. >> yeah. well, it is a great question and a kind of complicated one. one of my goals as a reporter was to try to understand the best record and think about what it was like to be so unpopular. does it matter? because their default view is it doesn't matter to my to select a statement. we are we are. in truth i think there are consequences. part of it is talent recruitment and retention in the real world,
on a 140 foot sailing ship, the seat association education, i was at sea for three weeks away from telephones, internet and libraries. but i was in the middle of a research project on benjamin franklin that required me to read material in french. i decided to use my time at sea to revise my french by reading a novel in that language. the book i chose is a small paperback edition of jules verne's around the world in 80 days first published as a newspaper serial in 1882. when i wasn't on watch or otherwise busy on the ship by slowly made my way to the book. my french was good enough to my surprise that i enjoyed the story and as a historian i appreciated it. a detail. especially the nature of the sense the protagonist racing around world. at his london club he remarks offhandedly that scheduled travel services could take a person around the globe in a period of the days. proved it, a challenge him and he is off. the att measure was only conceivable by the late nineteenth century. in the age of sail getting around world had taken months or even years. the speed of my sailing ship woul
, without education, the province will not be able to come out of the crisis. 768 schools bombed in the area. 58 schools bombed in this year, last year, 2012. i have not seen any major effort on the part of pakistan political government or military government to take up these major causes. unless pakistan, the status quo will not change. thank you. >> thank you. so, i'm going to focus on the afghan taliban which is a completely different than the pakistan taliban. my chapter on time harwich is one i'm going to focus on really covers 2002 as a major predictor reason i did this is because i believe that the patterns did they really were locked in by 2004. you know, i went back, looked to the chapter and i was trying to think about what could be cleaned from that period of the relevant for today. i was surprised to see, in fact most of the dynamics that are taking place on the ground in 2002 and 2003 in kinston and in kandahar are completely relevant to what's happening today. what i see happening today is to key questions that we need to sort of grapple with. the first is what happens when the
and it would be a tragedy if this country moved in a direction to make education less affordable. so we as a university are very dependent and concerned about the fiscal health of this country. >> host: amy gutmann, are you also in the classroom at the university? >> guest: i enjoy teaching and take every opportunity to meet with students, talk to students and teacher my spare time. >> host: what does a provost do and how library at princeton? >> guest: i was at princeton for 28 years of the time i got my phd to the time i came to pan and was dean of the faculty at princeton and the chief academic and financial officer at princeton or the progress works closely with the president. >> host: with the learning curve on being president of the university? >> guest: well, the learning curve is steep for anybody and it's also very exciting. >> host: gives a primer. just go the university of pennsylvania had 10,000 undergraduates and 10 dozen graduate students. we have about 4500 faculty members. we ran three hospitals and we have a great school of medicine as well as a great school of arts and
that would regenerate our interest in research and development and in education. the sputnik launch in 1957. it may been to a younger generation to defuse because sputnik is probably not as -- as it is to the older generation but i was pretty clever. most of his slogans were not really caught on. the first summer he was in wishing to and he said, and it's a strange construct but he said in august this is the time when the shinki and becomes more -- and nobody knows what it means. somehow it's applicable. [laughter] so on that low note, i think i'm going to see if you guys have any questions that you want to talk about. yes, sir m.? >> i'm surprised you didn't mention the president's that we popularly think are so eloquent john f. kennedy. where they just good at regular words? >> john f. kennedy had some wonderful phrases and new frontier was his. but they were eloquent in their sensibility and the speeches. it wasn't that they created a term that was everlasting and some of them have interesting -- you would go to new frontier and go to term and. truman had costs are. he brought that bac
, an outside moment that would regenerate our interest in research and development and in education and stuff, as had the sputnik launch in the 1957. it may have been to a younger generation it may have been too diffuse, because sputnik is probably not as big a thing as it is to an older generation, but that was pretty clever. but most of his slogans, most of his abilities so far have not, have not really caught on. the first summer he was in washington he said, and it's a strange construct, but he said in august he said this is the time when washington becomes all wee weed up and things are hard to get done. no one really knows what it means, but it's somehow applicable. [laughter] so on that low note, i think i'm going to see if you guys have any questions and want to talk about these things. yes, ma'am. >> i'm surprised that you didn't mention the president that we popularly think are the most eloquent; ronald reagan and john f. kennedy. were they just good at regular words, or did they -- >> oh, no, they had, i mean, john f. kennedy had wonderful phrases, and the new frontier was his. but
really understood the press has educational media, educational tv. there was -- everything that had been going on that we were involved in had been going on for a hundred years. and it was very hard to get out. now, i was -- because this is 1963, i was reminded that fred shuttles word came to get martin luther king on the 17th of december to promise that he would come to birmingham this year. but that is because on the 14th or 15th fred's church had been bombed for the third time in 1962. there had been 60 bombings of homes that had received no publicity. and fred shuttles worth was quite frank that he needed martin luther king to come over there to get any attention to this injustice. now, one of my other good friends, a guy who had been with us in the movement from cameraman was quite blunt with me about a, saying, look, you're going to have to cut me some slack because i have to keep the camera on dr. king because if they kill him and i don't get a picture of it, i lose my job. no, it was almost that cold and analysis where martin luther king knew that he was being used to focus on th
in a world where they're so closed to the changing social makeup of -- who is the educated work force in the united states anymore? mostly women, more and more diverse, and i you work at exxonmobil and go home to your family thanksgiving dinner and say i work at exxonmobil and half your cousins and your brothers look at you in disdain or worry, that's not a wing strategy over 30 years. so something has to give, i think. i'm not sure they think that, though. >> host: that's one of my questions, too. is that it seems to me that kind of, we are who we are and take it or leave it, don't care what everybody else thinks about that -- has that backfired on them? seems that could have been a force to cultivate more distrust and distaste, and help make them, as you say in the book, public enemy number one at pointness their history. >> guest: yeah. well, it's a great question and a kind of complicated one. i think one of my goals as a reporter was to try to understand as best i could and to think about what is it like to be so unpopular? does it matter? their default view, doesn't matter. just
, started megachurches, educational institutions and eventually became deeply involved in politics. beverly lehay who is a particular interest of mine in this book founded a group called conservative women for america which still claims to be the largest women's political organization in the united states, and she based her organization on five spiritual principles; the bible, the family, patriotism, the sanctity of marriage, the sanctity of life. and she began to litigate arguing that religious parents should have more control, for example, over what their children were taught in school, arguing that, um, the era, the equal rights amendment for women, was a violation of the fundamental order of things and winning many of these cases. >> host: did you interview her for your book? >> guest: i did not. she actually lives in seclusion now. she's very -- she retired about almost 15 years ago now and lives, um, in california again. >> host: somebody you would have liked to have talked to? >> guest: i would very much like to talk to her. and one of the things that i think is really important is t
and how they keep that oil -- getting makerbot is educational and how things are made in the manufacturing process and in the world around us. you can play me. >> host: where did you come up with the idea of? >> guest: 3-d printers have been around for 25 years but they were mainframe sized machines that were really expensive. i wanted one that i couldn't afford one. so some friends and i got together and we started tinkering. when it worked we quit our jobs and started makerbot so everybody could have one of these. >> host: bre pettis is the founder of makerbot in the ceo of the makerbot corporation out of brooklyn new york one of the hottest products here on the floor of ces. you have been watching "the communicators" on c-span
the cool ant goes and how they keep that separate from the oil. getting a makerbot is also an education in how things are made in the manufacturing process and in the world around us. >> host: are you the inventer? >> guest: you can blame me. [laughter] where did you come up with the idea? >> guest: you know, 3-d printers have been around for about 25 years, but they were mainframe-size machines that were really expensive. i wanted one. but i couldn't afford one. so some friends and i got together, and we started tinkering. and when it worked, we quit our jobs and started makerbot so everybody could have one of these. >> host: bre pettis is the founder of makerbot and the ceo of the makerbot corporation out of brooklyn, new york, one of the ottest products on -- hottest products here on the floor of ces. [inaudible conversations] >> host: and you've been watching "the communicators" on c-span from las vegas and ces international 2013, the technology show. we will be back next week with more programming from this con convention. >> david maraniss began researching and writing his tenth b
of years in p developing their own lek lodge -- technological capability, either the educational foundation of it or just any other aspects of oil and gas technology and so forth that they can't produce, come up with on their own reasonably, reasonably inexpensively or at least in comparison to what they have to sort of come up with if they have to deal with the rest of the world, and if particular, of course, whether they'll be forced to look to the u.s. or to the sort of traditional western position for that. >> well, thank you for that question. that is, indeed, the central question. that is the question that needs to be raised next. let me say, first of all, to put things in perspective that when i say that the russian oil industry is not ready, and i'm going to take a few minutes to answer this question, so i hope i won't keep you standing too long, we're talking about extremely clever people. and we're talking about people who are not standing still. so the right way to think of it is moving fronts. the world oil industry has been moving so fast that what we're talking about is a russ
is that my father taught me to value education. he was such a tirade about it. he often threatened to send it back to mexico if i didn't do well in school. >> host: was that a scary threat? >> guest: yes it was. i did not want to go back to mexico. i wanted to make him proud. i felt i owed him because he brought me here. i felt that i never wanted my father to say i should not have brought you. it always located me to do well in school and to do all these great things that he wanted me to do. and he never said that to me. as i was writing the book, really wanted to make sure that he didn't come across as the villain in the story. i really wanted to give him his humanity. there were a lot of great things about my dad. but he was also dealing with a lot of difficulties that unfortunately affected our relationship. >> host: you talked about them and go to church one sunday and he held up a budweiser beer and said, this is my god. when did he pass away? >> guest: he passed away last year. he died of liver cancer was diagnosed with cirrhosis and he kept drinking and never told us. he gave up dr
. that military cannot do anything about it. the religious discourse and more education can do that. so we been at the pakistani military can only have a limited impact. i would like to see a much broader effort to do with these decisions. thank you. >> three questions here, punch them together because they're pretty much out of time. we make the answer short and the question sure. thank you. i do not >> i thank you for the presentations. i have two questions. one of the main arguments is two days ago good situation or environment for pursuing negotiation of describing 2004. i want to know in light of all the things we know of what the government has received about the taliban and the americans, why does it say that americans taliban ace would find this two days good times in early 2000 when i mentioned iran. could you please elaborate more? the other is in passing i heard something about him yet and iran. they have any role is to discuss. thank you very much. >> katie from the department of state. mr. abbas, you linked the reference, the growth of ttp to the lack of support received two bodies
and sailors and marines. this absolutely fascinating. poster with your educational background? >> guest: every two bryn mawr college, proud women's college in pennsylvania. and then i had a stint abroad. the second is scotland. then i came back and went to harvard, a phd from harvard in philosophy. and then after harvard i started teaching aikido, where's associate professor but then came to georgetown but they stand that the naval academy and a few other lectureship theater and there. >> host: this is your first exposure to soldiers or had she been exposed to them before? >> guest: it's an interesting history. and that has been working she serve in vietnam. but in one case is a graduate school deferment. my husband's case and my brother was for medical reasons not eligible. and that was, as you know, a momentous come historical moment on college campuses in the late 60s, early 70s. it was an unpopular war and given there was prescription is an unpopular work. so when i went to the naval academy, i ended up serving, as i like to say next to kernels who had been in the palm and navy captain who
father taught me to value education. he was such a tyrant and a threat in me to go back to mexico. it really was scary. i believe tim. i did not want to go back. i wanted to make him proud and because i a day than to break in one negative bring me i felt i owed him that i did not want him to say i should not have brought you. that is what motivated me to do well in school for the things that i wanted to do because i did not want to hear that ever. he never said that. he didn't but as i was writing the book i wanted to make sure he did not come across as the villain. i wanted to give him his humanity. he had great things, my dad. also dealing with a lot of difficulties that unfortunately affected our relationship. >>host: you talk about how you wanted to go to church one sunday and he held up the budweiser saying this is my god. >>guest: he died from liver cancer last year. he was diagnosed with cirrhosis in 1993 and never told us and kept drinking. he actually gave up drinking in the late nineties and became a very religious. a seventh-day adventist. but he never got himself to ac
, well-educated, has his wife, coretta, and for children caught the young guest who were quite young, the youngest boreman 63, born in birmingham. so dexter irca the youngest is just an infant during this period. this is a period when dr. king is most political, in the sense that in the early your workout in the parting of the waters come he's getting drawn into other people's movements because he's an orator, and he would go help out. the bus boycott wasn't his idea. the freedom rides and the sit-ins certainly weren't his idea to give he would get called in to these meetings. but by 1963 where we start here, he's right and that the south is hardened against segregation and that the moment in history might fit without implementing something into history that will resist that recession, that retrograde trend. and he takes a huge risk to the he says i'm going to have my own movement. i'm going to risk everything. first in birmingham to try to crack segregation and then later in selma, where we ending 65, after the long year of 64 where he is lobbying and submitting to jail when st. aug
in the bronx to her education at princeton and yale
the founders and framers could have taken a ragtag band of poorly educated farmers and ill-equipped black smiths and defeat the world's greatest military? not ben franklin, not james madison, not thomas jefferson, only george. so george is a great, great man. and i think part of the reason historians haven't focused on his marriage and affairs because somehow it would be seen as diminishing him, and doesn't every great leader claim to be a self-made man? as a matter of fact, a lot of them are mother-made men or wife-made men or mistress-made men. washington could have been all of the above. when george was a young man, he had a great, great goal of being a gentleman planter and an officer in the british military. he wanted to be, you know, very important. the problem for george was this. while his father, augustine, did okay, george was the first-born son of the second marriage. and when augustine died when george was a little boy, augustine left almost everything to his sons from his first marriage because augustine had rotten marriage with his second wife. she was sort of a high mainten
education. which professors are most effective? you're all giving students who look like each other, same readings come same test, doing a good job. here's the answer. the professors with less experience and fewer degrees from a fancy universities, these professors have students who typically do better on standardized exams for the introductory courses but they also get a better student evaluations for their courses. clearly these young motivated instructors are more committed to the teachings in the old crusty guys with ph.d some places like harvard. the old guys must be using the same yellowing notes for use in 1978. they probably think powerpoint is an energy drink, except they don't know what an energy drink is either. the data tell us that we should find these old codgers, or at least let them retire gracefully. but hold on. don't fire anybody yet. the air force academy study has another relevant finding. about student performance over a longer horizon. they found that in math and science students who have more experience and more highly credentialed instructors in introductory cours
and the second act of the book is largely chicago with his education in california, new york and boston thrown in some but largely chicago and that is when he recreate himself as a political been, so when you think about it we are all sort of created from a lot of different strengths but i can't think of anybody with a more fascinating mix them obama. >> host: tell us about the team here. >> i can't tell you how happy i am about the people in working with. i don't know swahili which is the mother tongue of this part of kenya and most people speak english, they all don't and the drive on the other side of the road and i would have been dead if i tried to drive myself plus there are no road signs. the places we've, i couldn't find in a million years and i'm pretty good at finding things, so i definitely needed a great driver and we got one. he is a friend and interested in politics. i needed somebody on the ground to help set up interviews and the national archives and elsewhere. i looked out and got ken who is 40-years-old, investigative journalist and kenya, very tough, straightforward, smart,
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